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Lake Texoma Fish Species - Striped Bass
Lake Texoma Fish Species2024-06-24T12:12:55+00:00

Lake Texoma Fish Species

Lake Texoma provides habitat for at least 70 fish species!

Several of Lake Texoma’s fish specieis were introduced by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation (ODWC) and the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD). Those species popular for recreational fishing include largemouth, spotted, white, and striped bass, white crappie and channel, blue, and flathead catfish; The striped bass fishery at Lake Texoma is extremely popular and is considered one of the most successful striped fisheries in the nation. In addition, downstream of the dam is a tailwater fishery that supports striped bass, as well as channel, blue, and flathead catfish. Gizzard shad, threadfin shad, and Mississippi silverside are considered important forage species in the lake. Freshwater drum, carp, gar, buffalo, and river carpsucker make up the bulk of rough fishes in lake Texoma.

The lake was stocked with striped bass in the late 1960s, and has proven to be an excellent habitat for them. It is one of the seven U.S. inland lakes where the striped bass reproduce naturally, instead of being farmed and released into the waters. The “stripers” feed on large schools of shad, and often reach sizes of 12 to 20 pounds (lake record of 35.12 lb caught in 1984).

Several of Lake Texoma’s fish specieis were introduced by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation (ODWC) and the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD). Those species popular for recreational fishing include largemouth, spotted, white, and striped bass, white crappie and channel, blue, and flathead catfish; The striped bass fishery at Lake Texoma is extremely popular and is considered one of the most successful striped fisheries in the nation. In addition, downstream of the dam is a tailwater fishery that supports striped bass, as well as channel, blue, and flathead catfish. Gizzard shad, threadfin shad, and Mississippi silverside are considered important forage species in the lake. Freshwater drum, carp, gar, buffalo, and river carpsucker make up the bulk of rough fishes in lake Texoma.

The lake was stocked with striped bass in the late 1960s, and has proven to be an excellent habitat for them. It is one of the seven U.S. inland lakes where the striped bass reproduce naturally, instead of being farmed and released into the waters. The “stripers” feed on large schools of shad, and often reach sizes of 12 to 20 pounds (lake record of 35.12 lb caught in 1984).

Types of Lake Texoma Fish Brought to you by Jacob Orr’s Guaranteed Guide Service

In 2004, a blue catfish was pulled from the lake weighing in at 121.5 pounds, temporarily setting a world weight record for rod and reel caught catfish. More commonly, catfish in Lake Texoma weigh from 5 to about 70 pounds.

Lake Texoma Striper Fishing Guides - Dan Barnett & Jacob Orr Guaranteed Striper Fishing

Learn more about the following fish species found in Lake Texoma:

Lake Texoma Grand Slam

Catch all five of these species in the same day for the Texoma Grand Slam: Striped Bass, Largemouth Bass, Smallmouth Bass, White Bass and Spotted Bass. This is a rare but achievable goal and Dan Barnett is one of the few guides that has made this happen for his customers. If you would like to be one of the select few who has achieved this goal, book a trip with me today to go Smallmouth Bass fishing on Lake Texoma, and we'll give it a shot. Catching all five of Lake Texoma's best sporting fish in the same day is something to truly remember. It just doesn't get better than this!

Lake Texoma Fish Species – Alligator Gar

Alligator Gars are easily distinguished from other freshwater species by their long, slender, cylindrical bodies, their long snouts, and the fact that they are equipped with diamond-shaped interlocking (ganoid) scales. Additionally, the dorsal and anal fins are placed well back on the body, and nearly opposite each other. The tail fin is rounded. Alligator gar may be distinguished from other gars by the presence of two rows of large teeth on either side of the upper jaw in large young and adults.

Lake Texoma Fish Species – Black Crappie

Lake Texoma Fish Species: Black Crappie The black crappie is easily confused with the white crappie. However, it is deeper bodied than the white crappie, and silvery-green in color. There are no distinct vertical bars, rather there are irregular black blotches. The dorsal fin has seven or eight spines. Pomoxis is Greek for “opercle sharp,” and refers to the fact that the fish’s gill covers have spines. The species epithet nigromaculatus is Latin and means “black spotted.” Males do not develop specialized breeding coloration during spawning season. Other Names for Black Crappie: White perch, calico bass: Angling Importance: Black crappie predominate in Texas’.

Lake Texoma Fish Species – Blue Catfish

Lake Texoma Fish Species: Blue Catfish The blue catfish is the largest freshwater sportfish in Texas. Where mature populations exist, 50-pounders are not unusual. Typically, the largest fish are caught by trotliners, some of whom have landed specimens in excess of 115 pounds. Rod-and-reel anglers have anded specimens in excess of 80 pounds. Catfish is the second most preferred group of fish among licensed Texas anglers, and blues rank third behind channel and flathead catfish. Like the channel cat, the blue catfish is considered an excellent food fish. Other Names: Channel Cat, Hump-Back Blue; Ictalurus is Greek meaning “fish cat,” and furcatus.

Lake Texoma Fish Species – Channel Catfish

Lake Texoma Fish Species: Channel Catfish Lake Texoma Channel Catfish take a wide variety of baits including liver, worms, grasshoppers, shrimp, chicken, cheese and stinkbait, among others. Undoubtedly, part of the reason for their popularity is their delicious flavor when cooked. Channel catfish in excess of 36 pounds have been landed in Texas waters. The North American record stands at 58 pounds. Ictalurus is Greek and punctatus is Latin, meaning “fish cat” and “spotted,” respectively. Channel catfish are easily distinguished from all others, except blue catfish, by their deeply forked tail fin.

Lake Texoma Fish Species – Common Carp

Lake Texoma Fish Species: Common Carp Although Common Carp are generally considered a nuisance by North American anglers, they are highly prized as sportfish in Europe, as they are often excellent fighters. A growing number of anglers in the US are becoming interested in carp as a sportfish. Although flavor varies with the quality of the water from which fish were captured, their sheer abundance has made them an important food fish in some areas. The Texas rod-and-reel record is currently 25.6 pounds. The North American record exceeds 57 pounds.
Cyprinus is Greek, and carpio is

Lake Texoma Fish Species – Flathead Catfish

Lake Texoma Fish Species: Flathead Catfish The flathead catfish is the second largest freshwater sportfish in Texas, being outmuscled only by the blue catfish. Where mature populations exist, 50-pounders are not unusual. Typically, the largest fish are caught by trotliners, who have landed specimens in excess of 110 pounds. “Catfish” is the second most preferred group of fish among licensed Texas anglers, and flatheads rank second behind channel catfish. Rod and reel anglers may have the greatest success with flathead catfish just below reservoir dams.

Lake Texoma Fish Species – Freshwater Drum

Lake Texoma Fish Species: Freshwater Drum Although freshwater drum is considered a rough fish by many anglers, it is prized as a food fish in some areas. Drum are also sought after as bait for other species. In Texas the rod and reel record exceeds 30 pounds, and the trotline record is 55 pounds. Aplodinotus is Greek for “single back,” and grunniens is Latin for “grunting, referring to the fact that the species may be observed (or felt) making “grunting” sounds. Except for color, freshwater drum resembles its marine relative the red drum.

Lake Texoma Fish Species – Grizzard Shad

Lake Texoma Fish Species: Grizzard Shad Gizzard shad provide forage for most game species. They rarely bite on a hook, and when they do, they are generally considered worthless as a food fish. The species is often used as cut bait for other fish species. Dorosoma is Greek for “lance body,” referring to the lance-like shape of young shad. The species epithet cepedianum refers to the French naturalist Citoyen Lacepede. Gizzard shad are usually easily distinguished from threadfin shad by the fact that the upper jaw projects well beyond the lower jaw.

Lake Texoma Fish Species – Largemouth Bass

The largemouth bass is by far the most sought-after fish in Texas. When anglers were asked to “name the fish you prefer to catch in freshwater in Texas,” they chose largemouth bass three to one over striped bass, four to one over white bass, nearly five to one over channel catfish, and nearly ten to one over flathead catfish and white crappie. Because of the strong interest in largemouth bass fishing, there are hundreds of bass angling clubs in Texas devoted to fishing and conservation.

Lake Texoma Fish Species – Smallmouth Bass

Lake Texoma Fish Species: Smallmouth Bass The smallmouth bass is generally green with dark vertical bands rather than ahorizontal band along the side. There are 13-15 soft rays in the dorsal fin, and the upper jaw never extends beyond the eye. Micropterus is Greek meaning “small fin” [see Guadalupe bass for further explanation]. The species epithet dolomieu refers to the French mineralogist M. Dolomieu. Angling Importance: Because of its reputation in other parts of the US as an excellent sport fish, the smallmouth bass has been introduced into a number of Texas reservoirs and streams. Minnows, crayfish, and alderfly larvae (hellgrammites).

Lake Texoma Fish Species – Smallmouth Buffalo

Lake Texoma Fish Species: Smallmouth Buffalo Although some anglers consider smallmouth buffalo to be a rough fish, in many areas the species is highly prized. Specimens in excess of 82 pounds have been landed by rod and reel anglers, whereas the trotline record is 97 pounds in Texas. Buffalo will sometimes take doughballs made with cottonseed meal, and when hooked provide exceptional sport. Many people may be unaware that smallmouth buffalo is quite a food fish. It is the number one species sold by commercial freshwater fishermen.

Ictiobus and bubalus are both Greek words meaning “bull

Lake Texoma Fish Species – Spotted Bass

Despite the fact that spotted bass are not nearly so large and numerous as largemouth bass (in Texas their maximum size is less than one-third that of largemouth bass), they are excellent fighters. Spotted bass are very popular in east Texas, particularly in the Sabine, Neches, and Cypress Rivers. Known maximum size in Texas exceeds 5.5 pounds. Micropterus is Greek meaning "small fin" [see Guadalupe bass for further explanation]. The species epithet punctulatus, Latin for "dotted," refers to rows of dark spots on the lower sides.

Lake Texoma Fish Species – Spotted Gar

Lake Texoma Fish Species: Spotted Gar The spotted gar is one of three gar species native to Texas. They are primitive fish and date back to the Cretaceous period, some 65 to 100 million years ago. The ancestors of spotted gar swam with the dinosaurs! A large gar can eat a lot of fish, including catfish, causing them to compete with some anglers. Because of the competition and because many people think gar are difficult to clean, gar are sometimes called a “trash” fish. This term may not be warranted when you consider that spotted

Lake Texoma Fish Species – Striped Bass

The striped bass is he largest member of the sea bass family, often called "temperate" or "true" bass to distinguish it from species such as largemouth, smallmouth, and spotted bass which are actually members of the sunfish family Centrarchidae. Although Morone is of unknown derivation, saxatilis is Latin meaning "dwelling among rocks." As with other true basses, the dorsal fin is clearly separated into spiny and soft-rayed portions. Striped bass are silvery, shading to olive-green on the back and white on the belly, with seven or eight uninterrupted horizontal stripes on each side of the body.

Lake Texoma Fish Species – Threadfin Shad

Lake Texoma Fish Species: Threadfin Shad Dorosoma is Greek for “lance body,” referring to the lance-like shape of young shad. The word petenense refers to Lake Peten in the Yucatan, the species type locality. Threadfin shad are usually easily distinguished from gizzard shad by the fact that the upper jaw does not project beyond the lower jaw. The anal fin usually has 20-25 rays, as opposed to 29-35 rays found in gizzard shad. The upper surface is silver-blue and grades to nearly white on the sides and belly. All fins have yellow tint except the

Lake Texoma Fish Species – White Bass

White bass are the 5th most preferred species among licensed Texas anglers. Schools of white bass feeding on shad generate excitement in the fishing community. Once a school has been located, successful anglers often fish the surface with spoons or spinners. Bottom fishing at night with live bait may also produce great success. White bass are excellent fighters, and considered superb table fare. Morone is of unknown derivation. The species epithet chrysops is Greek meaning “golden eye.” Like other true basses, the dorsal fin is clearly double, separated into spiny and soft-rayed portions. White bass are silvery shading from dark-gray or black on the back to white on the belly.

Lake Texoma Fish Species – White Crappie

Taken together, white crappie and black crappie combined) is the most popular panfish in Texas. The crappie group is the third most preferred group overall, ranking behind only “bass” and “catfish.” Crappie are sought after by both bank and boat anglers. Typically, minnows are the preferred bait, often producing monumental results when an aggregation is located, usually around submerged trees, boat docks, or other submerged structures. White crappie in excess of 4.5 pounds have been landed in Texas waters. Pomoxis is Greek for “opercle sharp” and refers to the fact that the fish’s gill covers have spines.

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